Organic Rose Water Application

Skin Care

Rose Water is very gentle and suitable for all skin types, even the most sensitive.

The Benefits of Rose Water Address Common Beauty Concerns:

Sensitive and sun-exposed skin – It has anti-inflammatory properties that soothe irritated skin and reduce redness.
Blotchy and Discoloured Skin – Rose water helps reduce skin blotchiness and evens out skin tone.
Mature skin – It decreases damage to skin’s elastic fibres and it is believed that it may also help reduce or delay wrinkle formation.
Dry skin – Rose water is a good moisturiser that treats dry skin (which is also a problem for ageing skin. Excessive dryness can also lead to wrinkling and fine lines.
Oily skin - It also has anti-bacterial properties, making it a good skin cleanser for removing oil and dirt that can result in clogged pores and, therefore, preventing acne and blemishes.
Problem skin – Rose water helps maintain skin’s natural pH, which helps regulate skin that is prone to conditions like rosacea and eczema.

Aromatherapy

Rose is a powerful mode enhancer. It helps relieves Stress, Fights Anxiety, and Relaxes Your Body and Mind.

• Spray over your face and hair and breath in to sooth your mind
• Use as a bath supplement to relieve stress
• Use in your aroma lamp to fight Anxiety
• Spray over your bed sheets and pillows for a good night sleep


Cooking

Cooking with rose water is a simple way to elevate both sweet and savory dishes. Use it to add a floral element to frozen treats such as sorbet and granita, and to baked goods such as cookies and cupcakes. Rose water and vanilla are an especially enticing match—mix rose water with vanilla extract or vanilla bean to add a creamy, luscious flavor to desserts. With a drop of rose water you can enhance simple ingredients such as fresh fruit or put a new spin on tried-and-true recipes. Rose water also carries endless savory applications, complementing aromatics such as cardamom, coriander, cumin, saffron, ginger, and more. Just remember—a little goes a long way. Depending on the recipe, you may not even need a teaspoon.